Barking up the wrong tree

Barking2Has anyone noticed the actual problem with idioms and highly visual children?  Children with Dyslexia, ADHD, Aspergers and Autism are likely to have excellent visual strengths so mentioning an idiom to them sends them off into trying to sort out expressions like, Barking up the wrong tree!

Here is an extract from my new book: Misunderstood Greatness….and How to Change this.      Neurodiversity through the Lens of Mental Imagery…pre-publication, get 2 FREE chapters here.

An idiom a common word or phrase with a culturally understood meaning that differs from what its composite words’ denotations would suggest. For example, an English speaker would understand the phrase “kick the bucket” to mean “to die” – and also to actually kick a bucket.  Idioms are a big challenge to many highly visual students. Reflecting on this through the lens of mental imagery, I realised what the problem is.  Idioms are very visual, here are a few examples, that will send a visual thinker off into the wrong train of thought:

A hot potato                                               A penny for your thoughts
Actions speak louder than words         At the drop of a hat
Back to the drawing board                     Ball is in your court
Cut corners                                                Be glad to see the back of…….
Beat around the bush.                             Best of both worlds
Best thing since sliced bread                  Bite off more than you can chew
Blessing in disguise                                  Burn the midnight oil
Can’t judge a book by its cover              Caught between two stools
Costs an arm and a leg                             Cross that bridge when you come to it
Cry over spilled milk                                Curiosity killed the cat

 

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About olivehickmott

I am a Forensic Learning coach, specialising in showing people how they can create their own health and learning
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