7 poor processes for teaching word recognition

p49_dinasaurWord recognition is necessary for fluent reading.  But with an emphasis on phonics ONLY, word recognition is left either left to chance or not being taught well in school.  One of the first words you can be expected to read or write is your name and the easy way to do that is through word recognition.

There are at least 7 ways that are poor strategies for developing word recognition, that can be improved, by the work done by Empowering Learning with the aid of neuroscience:

  1. Being stressed –  when you are stressed it is very difficult to do anything and that includes reading and writing. Grounding, breathing and being relaxed will improve this.
  2. 3 positions for reading – try reading looking down at the desk, then with the book slightly tipped up then with the book right up in front of your eyes.  Which is the best position for you? Flat on the table is normally more difficult and if you have any visual stress with the letters moving around on the page, don’t look down it puts you into negative emotions or nasty self-talk.
  3. Expecting that decoding words through phonics will lead to word recognition. This works for some but others drop into mild or severe learning difficulties. It is a poor strategy as neuroscience tells us that word recognition and decoding words work in different parts of the brain and it relies on luck to make this migration. Read on and see how this can be improved.
  4. Techniques where you look at the word, cover it and then attempt to write it.  When students are looking down at a desk they are not in the best position for getting their brain to access their word form area that is part of their internal mental imagery.  When students look up they will have better access to mental imagery, vital for word recognition.  For example, think of a dog; looking up will give you the best picture, looking down will get you into your emotions (maybe frightened) and self-talk (thinking he will bt me). The series that works best is Lookup, capture the image, see the image and write it down (without looking down at the paper).
  5. Focusing on high-frequency words does not encourage word recognition, most don’t have mental images.  Start with object words until the student is confident of visualising words.
  6. Modelling plasticine is a useful technique but is slow and repetitive and it does not encourage the student to look up and see their own mental images
  7. Nonsense words focus on phonics and we certainly don’t want students creating mental images of nonsense words.

 

Join our series of Changing Dyslexia for a new decade and find out do word recognition easily and effectively in minutes, whether or not you are Dyslexic.  This work is all based on how people who do word recognition successfully do it, it is just a skill to learn.

#dyslexia #wordrecognition #nonsensewords #highfrequencywords #lookcoverwrite #decoding #empoweringlearning

 

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Learning Differences – How to Connect the Dots: Making a Real Difference for the Next Generation

family of four walking at the street

Photo by Emma Bauso on Pexels.com

Tuesday 21st January, 2020, at the Richmond NLP group,  with Olive Hickmott and learn how children learn best

Booking:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/learning-differences-how-to-connect-the-dots-tickets-89493199569

Olive is a specialist expert mainly working with students. However, her work also applies to us, as coaches, NLP’ers and our clients – possibly our families as well. Learning differences are normal. It’s how they are managed successfully that’s key. And these days we know so much more about the brain and how it works.

I recently heard an interview with Jamie Oliver about how he didn’t fit in at school. As a result, cooking became his passion, something he found easy and that he was good at. He may have been ‘written off’ at school, but look how much he’s achieved, in spite of everything. By chance and circumstances, he was lucky enough to find his own way, Olive shows others theirs.

She is passionate at helping individuals to be as resourced as possible to support them on their life journey of learning and personal growth in a way to maximise their outcomes and results.

This will be an incredibly informative session and highly applicable. Olive is a generous speaker, especially in her willingness to share her research and the immense depth of knowledge relating to her work. Suffice to say she will be sharing as much as she can and answering your questions, in this 2-hour session.

What’s it all about?

  • What happens when learning isn’t a ‘good’ experience?
  • How can we appreciate and utilise different learning styles and strategies?
  • How can we best serve our neurodivergent students, their families and schools?
  • How can we stop learners drifting into mental health challenges?

Olive Hickmott is an Author, Trainer and Forensic Learning Coach.  She has been an expert in how neurodivergent children best learn and it is not being taught as if they are neuro-typical.  She is an international expert in how children learn visually for more than a decade and how neglecting these strengths contributes to Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, ADHD, Dyspraxia, Aspergers and Autism.  The most serious consequence is that students many develop stress, anxiety, self-harm, are traumatised, bullied as they drift into a host of mental health symptoms.  

Empowering Learning has skills to change this in primary school, and coaches to work alongside hard-pressed teachers and SENCOs, to minimise learning difficulties before children progress to senior school.  Learning differences should not lead to learning difficulties. Empowering Learning is a great opportunity for coaches and especially NLP coaches to make a real difference to the next generation – its fun and exciting for parents, students, teachers and coaches! She has recently published her 3rd book on this topic called, The Elephants in the Classroom: uncovering every student’s natural power of mental Imagery to enhance learning. She has not integrated skills for how good breathing can improve grounding and reduce anxiety. She is currently running a series of webinars entitled Changing Dyslexia for a new decade, see http://www.tiahl.org/masterclasses.  You can learn more about her work at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk

For  details etc: http://www.richmondnlpgroup.org.uk/5.html

#theelephaantsintheclassroom #Dyslexia #ADHD #ASD #neurdiversity #richmondNLP #nlp #olivehickmott

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Children may complain “I can’t draw”

clawHow often do you hear a child say “I can’t draw” and screw up the piece of paper when you think it is a lovely drawing/painting?

There are 3 reasons common I know about this, that you might not have thought of:

  • The mental image they were holding in their head is much better than the one they have produced on paper.  These people are extremely fortunate to be able to create exceptional mental images, often in full colour.  If they persevere they will get better at copying down to paper, but it is quite understandable that they are initially frustrated.
  • Those who have neurodivergent ways of thinking and learning often have the most fabulous mental images and if they have difficulties keeping them still being grounded and relaxed will help.
  • When copying down to paper encourage them to look up at the mental image and copy it just like they are copying from a real picture. If they look down they may lose the mental image.

In addition, make sure you praise a picture very specifically, it is called descriptive praise. For example, “I really like the blue and green colours you have used there it brings the whole picture alive”.  If you just say “that’s lovely” or “clever girl” that can fly straight over their head and if they don’t agree may cause them to get angry. Do keep encouraging them, being able to draw the pictures you make up in your head is a fabulous talent.

I hope these ideas help you.

#drawing #neurodivergent #descriptivepraise

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The joy of successful learning, even with Dyslexia

no-problem-studying-dec15_colour_smallerChildren can achieve magic when given the right tools, that match their strengths.  Here are a couple of examples:

Richard

yvonne

To learn how to teach visualisation skills,  sign up for our newsletter at  www.empoweringlearning.co.uk or join us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/empoweringlearning/

Olive Hickmott is the Founder of Empowering Learning, author of, Seeing Spells AchievingBridges to Success – how to transform Learning Difficulties and The Elephants in the Classroom – uncovering every student’s natural power of mental imagery to enhance learning.  In The Elephants in the Classroom, lots of other true success stories.  Olive and those she has trained work with people in a coaching framework to help them understand their own experiences and learn new skills to change these if they want.  Their outstanding skills are just enhanced, never diminished.

#joydyslexia #joy #dyslexia #visualisation #strengths #theelephantsintheclassroom #bridgestosuccess

 

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The strengths of Dyslexia

creativityPeople often ask about the strengths of Dyslexia; here is my summary of exceptional characteristics that  I consistently see in myself, my clients, friends and colleagues with Dyslexia. You will notice them in children and manifesting in particular jobs for adults.  Many of these strengths are founded in having exceptional mental imagery and are seen with many adults in creativity, business, design, sport, artists and IT.

  1. Ability to see things from different perspectives, at the same time. Dyslexics can not only imagine what physical objects look like from different perspectives, including cross-sections, they can also see, without any difficulty, the other side of an argument, business opportunities others don’t see; the list is endless.
  2. Ability to see 2D objects in 3D. For example, when looking at an Ordnance Survey map, which is flat, they notice the contour lines and can create within seconds a 3D pictures of the mountains and hills, in their mind’s eye
  3. High-speed ability to make connections between different facts. This leads to amazing insights but can lose the audience
  4. Picture thinking and a mind’s eye that can run anything as a very fast video. This is invaluable for fast recall and in particular working in the media.
  5. Exception interpersonal skills. Their creative verbal communications often makes up for their lack of written communications.
  6. Look back in history to all the famous people who were Dyslexic, they were all very creative. Today we have Jamie Oliver and Richard Branson for example.
  7. High intelligence. Every Dyslexic I meet has well above average intelligence
  8. I created the word “Perspectious” once to mean genius-level ability to see different perspectives simultaneously, I think this sums up their attributes.

Olive Hickmott is the Founder of Empowering Learning, author of the bestsellers, Seeing Spells Achieving, Bridges to Success – how to transform Learning Difficulties and The Elephants in the Classroom – uncovering every student’s natural power of mental imagery to enhance learning.  In The Elephants in the Classroom, you will find a whole chapter on neurodivergent strengths.  Olive and those she has trained work with people in a coaching framework to help them understand their own experiences and learn new skills to change these if they want.  Their outstanding skills are just enhanced, never diminished.

#perspectius #theemephantsintheclassroom # strengths # dyslexia #dyslexic #visualskills

 

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Have you been told that Dyslexia is genetic?j

family of four walking at the street

Photo by Emma Bauso on Pexels.com

I have met many parents who feel guilty thinking that Dyslexia is genetic and then proved that it isn’t.

Let’s start with me, dyslexic and neither of my parents nor my brother was. In fact, they were excellent readers and spellers. Now I still have dyslexic traits but I learnt to spell and read a few years ago using my visual skills. Does this make me a reformed dyslexic? Then I met a pair of identical twins, and then a pair of non-identical twins, one highly dyslexic, the other with no signs at all. So how could this be genetic?

But what I did notice was that they all had highly visual parents, and seemed to have passed on their skills to their children – they had exceptional mental imagery and attention to detail, in fields of art, engineering, design, etc.   Now if you have exceptional visual skills (memory, recall, thinking in pictures), and you are anxious then your mental images may start disappearing, fracturing or running around too fast to see. These are the same mental images you need for words, to enable you to recognise words and spell well in the English language.

So the aspect that may be genetic is thinking in pictures but it doesn’t have to lead to Dyslexia. And as I often quoted “learning differences should not lead to learning difficulties”. 

The first thing to do is reduce the anxiety (we all know that we can’t remember anything when stressed) and then teach people to recognise words, just the same as recognising signs, your name, etc.  It is really easy.

This is one of the blocks that is keeping dyslexics stuck in a “no hope” paradigm.  There are many others so do come and join us for our free “Dyslexia for a new decade” series of teleseminars.

Alternatively,  you can take a look at my latest book, The Elephants in the Classroom, and discover the 27 other contradictions that are holding back so many children.

#theelephantsintheclassroom #dyslexia #genetic #newdecadefordyslexia

 

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Skills for neurodivergent students – Jan 13th

Would you like to know more about the tool-box we have developed for assisting Dyslexic, ADHD and Autistic students, based on their strengths?

Olive Hickmott is an Author, Trainer and Forensic Learning Coach.  She has been an expert in how neurodivergent children best learn and it is not being taught as if they are neurotypical.  She is an international expert in how children learn visually and how neglecting these strengths contributes to Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, ADHD, Dyspraxia, Aspergers and Autism.  The most serious consequence is that many develop stress, anxiety, self-harm, are traumatised, bullied as they drift into a host of mental health symptoms.
Empowering Learning has skills to change this in primary school, and neurodivergent learning coaches to work alongside hard-pressed teachers and SENCOs, to minimise learning difficulties before children progress to senior school.  Learning differences should not lead to learning difficulties. 
Olive is speaking at The White Horse, Bourne End, HP1 2RH 9:30-11:30 Jan 13th, £10. Do come and join us and gain some different perspectives for what you can do quickly and easily to assist neurodivergent students. She will be summarising her vision of a new decade for Dyslexia and how we could make Hertfordshire a Dyslexia-free county.
#olivehickmott #empoweringlearning #dyslexia #dyscalculia #ADHD #autism #SENCOs #neurodivergent #mentalhealth
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