Visual Thinking 101_23 How we could eliminate Dyslexia and keep the visual skills

I am delighted to be speaking at the ANLP International Conference in May 2023. You will learn how developing natural visual skills can eliminate Dyslexia for many of our create imaginative young people. After helping Dyslexics improve their literacy and numeracy for more than 20 years, now is the time to move toward prevention.

Here is a summary of my session and a short 12-minute video that will explain all. https://www.nlpconference.com/olivehickmott

If you would like to start with a preview of how to use mental imagery for learning, join our free on-line teleseminar on Wednesday 1st February at 8pm.  You will get lots of tips to help you understand your own experience and make simple changes if you wish.

Register here: https://www.learndesk.us/live/5066873454460928/explore-mental-pictures

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.  You will be able to ask questions on line; We look forward to hearing from you.

For other resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk and www.empoweringlearning.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #Dyslexia #ANLP #nnlpconference

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Visual Thinking 101_22 Have you heard about mental imagery and ADHD

People with ADHD often have very fast moving mental images, their brain runs like a Ferrari, without any breaks. This is great for mental gymnastics, making high speed connections between various facts and all manner of clever stuff.

The only problem is that all this high speed stuff can be quite overwhelming, for example:

  • very fast moving mental images
  • your thoughts going too fast to catch them
  • multiple mental images – when you try to image one image of say a cat you get 100 and they are all fighting – very scary
  • fractured mental images – that is like the image was on a piece of glass and the glass breaks – so you have bits of cat flying all over the place
  • multiple screens – this is like going into a TV shop and there banks of televisions on and you have to watch them all.

But the medical profession have not connected mental imagery and ADHD. You don’t need a large research project just a quick discussion with someone diagnosed with ADHD, and their exceptional skills are clear. In addition we know how people can start to control their imagery when they want to focus. It takes just a few minutes to teach, the student just needs to practice. And don’t believe anyone who says you are born with ADHD, until you have tried these skills.

There has been a petition to improve adult ADHD screening, inform patients, end discrimination and improve self-management. It will be discussed in Parliament in Feb 2023. I look forward to mental imagery being included in the self-management tools.

If you have experienced one or all of the above do come and join our free on-line teleseminar on Wednesday 1st February at 8pm.  You will get lots of tips to help you understand your own experience and make simple changes if you wish.

Register here: https://www.learndesk.us/live/5066873454460928/explore-mental-pictures

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.  You will be able to ask questions on line; We look forward to hearing from you.

For other resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk and www.empoweringlearning.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #ADHD

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Visual Thinking 101_21 OFSTED’s reading report

Last November OFSTED published their research “Now the whole school is reading: supporting struggling readers in secondary school”.

The introduction states, “Each year, around one-quarter of 11-year-olds do not reach the expected standards in reading at the end of their primary school”.

Very informative, but I am left with questions and no ideas who to address them to, for answers.


  1. The report itemises extra costs, training and resources that secondary schools have had to fund, but there is no mention of why children are transferring from primary with these challenges and the case for better funding in primary.
  2. Did the work include or exclude neurodivergent students who are diagnosed with Dyslexia, ADHD etc? If included, this confirms that Dyslexics can learn to read, which is not generally accepted; if excluded, this is not a representative sample.
  3. Was there any acknowledgement as to whether the students were visual thinkers and if so did the assessments and strategies take this into account.
  4. Do any detailed assessments check to discover whether the student is picturing words in their Word Form Area. This specific reading gap is an essential skill for fluency and accelerating phonics.
  5. Do any of the remedial programmes do anything to reduce a child’s anxiety that has developed over years of failure/bullying etc, such as grounding and breathing techniques?
  6. When reading aloud in a classroom, performance anxiety can make struggling readers much worse than their actual skill level.
  7. The report is an interesting description of reading, but what about spelling and handwriting, which are part of the same challenge?

    If you want to know more do join one of my free online live classes, Thriving with Dyslexia or Visual Thinking and Learning for Adults. Just click the link..

For other resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk and www.empoweringlearning.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #Dyslexia #OFSTED #phonics #wholeschoolreading #reading

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Visual Thinking 101_20 More mysteries

You will find 27 contradictions and mysteries in my book “The Elephants in the Classroom”. Here are a few more of my favorites;

Phonics may have improved reading for many, but visual thinkers and dyslexics can’t cope with the minutiae of phonics, that doesn’t have any visual meaning. They find whole word recognition much more natural, which is the target for fluency in any reading strategy. Students are left to pick up word recognition by chance, whereas students could be easily checked, before they get confused, and taught in minutes.

Visual thinkers are not learning in the best way for them in a school that emphasizes primarily rote learning[i]. “They find the easy things in primary school can be hard, whilst the hard things in advanced work later in life can be easy,” said Thomas G West.  More advanced work requires creativity, the ability to make connections, inspiration, etc. – all the skills visual thinkers have in abundance.

Reading flat on a table is unnatural, puts more unnecessary strain on struggling students, who may find letters being distorted or moving around. Looking down eliminates mental imagery and increases emotions, making matters worse. Reading with work propped up will help increase fluency.

Reading comics may be more comfortable as speech bubbles are typically in capitals, that don’t turn around and make different letters.

Idioms are highly visual and are taken literally by visual thinking students, who convert them to pictures and thus find they make no sense. Please try to avoid using idioms until students are coping better, with the English language. 

[i] Rote learning is learning by constant repetition, like most people learn their time tables

If you would like to know more about how this all works, do join one of my free on-line live classes, Ready for a new strategy for Dyslexia. Just click the link below.

For other resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk and www.empoweringlearning.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #Dyslexia #mysteries #phonics #reading #idioms

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Visual Thinking 101_19 Does this made sense?

Here is the paradox: There are many mysteries and other seeming contradictions in the world of learning differences, which don’t make any logical sense and all too often, are seldom noticed.  Neurodiversity has benefitted much from recent neuroscience, which doesn’t seem to have transfered to the national curriculum.. Once you shine a light on what is happening behind the obvious and approach these same questions from the perspective of mental imagery, you may find the answers are straightforward. Mental Imagery and understanding visual thinking provide very simple solutions to many of these mysteries and, to me, it seems as if society is looking in the wrong places. 

Amanda Spielman, OFSTED Chief Inspector, said[i] that “children’s time in education are their wonder years. A time when they get to grips with the power and flexibility of the English Language and fundamental mathematical concepts.” She continued, “High-quality education, built around a rich curriculum, is a matter of social justice…. Using the definition of cognitive psychology, as a change in long-term memory, if nothing has altered in long-term memory, nothing has been learned.” “The ability to read is a fundamental life skill” So, failing to assess children’s visual memory, a vital part of their long-term memory, is not socially just.

Visual thinking is a huge strength of 4-year-olds, as I have mentioned before. Mental imagery is a vital part of visual thinking and learning anything, but nobody even mentions it in schools. The classroom is mainly an auditory experience, and the box for visual teaching is ticked with knowledge of visual teaching but without any knowledge of a student’s visual learning. There is no teacher training in mental imagery, and it is not even mentioned in the UK’s Early Years curriculum[2], contradicting the schools’ commitment to multi-sensory teaching and learning. Mental imagery is a key part of visual learning – it can’t be right not to teach teachers about the key role mental imagery plays in learning!  It is indeed a remarkable school with an enlightened staff that teaches students how to visualise.  

By comparison, mental imagery is an accepted part of sports training, with every elite sportsperson unable to manage without this skill. For example, athletes envision the ball going into the net, the flight of a javelin and not just winning a race but having successful strategies for every part of a race.  For instance, watch someone taking a conversion kick on the rugby field, or playing golf. You can see them visually following the trajectory of an imaginary ball, before making contact; you will see these skills in action. Can you imagine how a pole-vaulter, a ballerina, a high board diver or a gymnast could manage without good mental imagery for rehearsal?  Elite sportsmen and women have used these skills for decades.

Let me give you a couple of examples now and I will give more tomorrow:

Schools are committed to multi-sensory teaching and learning but, for example, 100% of the dyslexics we have met are not visualising words; 100% of those with ADHD can’t control their mental images; and 100% of those we have met on the autistic spectrum are simply drowning in mental images. Teacher training does not include the vital difference between visual teaching and visual learning, which are often mistakenly thought to be the same thing and highlighted in “When Bright Kids Can’t Learn” by John F Heath.  We are not aware of any teacher education in how students learn visually, using mental images, for all sorts of applications (spelling, reading, comprehension, remembering what you read, good handwriting, maths, memory, sport, etc.). This means that teachers and their neurodivergent students are being set up to fail.

Both the English and French languages, as well as a number of others have deep orthographic structures, meaning there is a large gap between what a word sounds like and how it is written, so students need to learn how to visualise words, to cope with homophones, silent letters, and words that break a variety of rules. Italian is considered an exemplar of a phonetic language where you write exactly what you hear, not so for English. This means for English you need mental images to read fluently and to spell.



[i] Amanda Spielman, speaking in 2019, at the “Wonder Years” curriculum conference.

[2] The Early Years Foundation Stage was published in 2008, by the Department for Children, Schools and Families.  ISBN: 978-1-84775-128-7

If you would like to know more about how this all works, do join one of my free on-line live classes, Ready for a new strategy for Dyslexia. Just click the link below.

For other resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk and www.empoweringlearning.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #ADHD #Dyslexia #mysteries #amandaspielman #OFSTED #wordrecognition

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Visual Thinking 101_18 Losing my visual pictures

My real passion is to alleviate and prevent much of the confusion that threatens to overwhelm students. Teachers and parents of children under 7 years old need to incorporate visualisation into any and all forms of teaching and learning, especially literacy and numeracy. Nobody showed me how to use my visual brain for literacy – something that has affected my entire life. It would have been simply turning on what had been turned off.

I call myself a reformed dyslexic, because I struggled in school with literacy, long before dyslexia was commonly noticed in schools. Had I been born later, I would probably have been labelled dyslexic. I have subsequently learned for myself those vital missing skills that have in turn inspired my efforts to help others. My hyperactive brain could have also got me diagnosed with ADHD and a splash of Asperger’s.  I am now an avid reader which has helped me to learn and reduce any number of other symptoms. My curiosity prompted me to discover why some talented students are successful while others struggle. From my perspective, there are very different experiences of visual thinking and mental imagery that dramatically affect every learner. 

I live in a permanent state of curiosity, with a ‘jigsaw-puzzle’ brain that people around me might find challenging but which has, I believe, the potential to be quite powerful. My mind can make intuitive leaps and see connections in things that others may keep separate. I see things clearly that others do not see. Things are obvious to me – I don’t know why – perhaps because of fast connections, insights or something else. There is nothing special about me, my brain likes understanding ‘why’ and connecting things, like huge jigsaw puzzles, in several dimensions – I am just a visual spatial thinker. I see the same skills in many of my students. For someone who is neurodivergent, the biggest challenge is to present this knowledge in a way others can cope with and take action.

School – Trying to Learn in the Dark

Entering the school system, in the UK, at age 4, my literacy was progressing, fitfully. By the age of seven, I was really struggling. I had also lost my ability to visualise anything. My report at 16 says: “Hampered by lack of vocabulary and atrocious spelling, she has an inability to express herself clearly. It really would help if Olive could learn to spell.” I had been in the same school for 12 years and was generally a good but often shy student. It took me another 40 years to discover the secret of why literacy, in English, seemed so tricky. Having no mental images of words was like trying to read and write in the dark. I realised then that schools take no responsibility for their teaching methods negatively affecting their students’ ability to spell or read fluently. Especially nowadays when the curriculum is so prescriptive. I was expected to fix this, and I had no idea how to do it. I now regret, missing out on all that fabulous children’s literature, for I could read to myself, but I couldn’t remember anything I read. As a result, I found reading boring, and I only read those things I had to, rather than for pleasure. 

A teacher once told my mother that my brain was far too fast for my hand, which was nearly accurate, and would probably be called ADHD now.  You may notice I have a very different perspective on many things, which is a common and positive dyslexic trait. I write to share these different approaches with students, their parents and their teachers.

I now feel privileged not to have been given any label in the past, although I knew my literacy skills were well below average. I recall wanting to disappear into the floor when we were reading aloud in class – dreading my turn coming around. I never read for pleasure until I was nearly 40 when I wanted to read to our son. How could I contemplate reading anything for fun when I found it such a nightmare? I also studied French for years and never managed to achieve ‘O’ level. Now, whose idea was it to teach me another language, when I couldn’t spell or read in my first language?

However, I did GCSE and A Levels Maths a year early, which was almost unheard of in the 1970s, thanks partly to my excellent mental images of numbers. I then graduated from Sussex University with an honors degree in mathematics and became a software engineer. Computer programmers are often visual spatial thinkers.

If you would like to know more about how this all works, do join one of my free on-line live classes, Ready for a new strategy for Dyslexia. Just click the link below.

For all available resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #GCSE #ADHD #Dyslexia #maths #cantvisualise #reading

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Visual Thinking 101_17 Why do letters move?

How do letters move on the page? How do letters move in your mind’s eye? Maybe only visual thinkers have got the skill to do this. But why do they do it?

When I first started working with dyslexic students 23 years ago, some told me that letters moved on the page. Some felt positively sick. I read a piece of research that said, the more stressed a child gets the faster the letters move until they look like rivers or fall off the page all together. My visual thinking brain, had 2 lightbulb moments:

  • What happens when you do the opposite and help the student reduce their stress? And to my amazement the letters stopped moving!
  • If the letters are moving on the page, what are they doing in the students’ mind’s eye? The answer was often dancing around and changing places.

So I now had a model for stopping letters moving, that any child could learn in minutes, without medication or additional glasses/colored overlays; just a little practice. The secret was simply to reduce the child’s stress levels, here are a few tips:

  • Firstly breathing in and out gently through your nose, right down into your belly, will slow your brain and create relaxation. The movement of letters will slow down.
  • Secondly feel grounded, firmly connected to the earth. With a little practice letters will stop moving.
  • When you have learned to visualise words, literacy will become so much easier, and this in itself will improve your confidence and create more relaxation.
  • Look up and don’t look down. Looking down engages your emotions and that nasty self talk many have that says “I can’t do this”. When you look up you will be in your visual field and avoiding emotions. So if you are trying to read, don’t put the material flat on the table, move it so that you are slightly looking up, like how proficient reader access a newspaper or a book
  • For those who are interested in neuroscience, these 3 tips will re-engage your frontal cortex which is the policeman for martialing clarity of through.

You will find more information about sleep, breathing and grounding on my YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/KyNm0YUm7EM

If you would like to know more about how this all works, do join one of my free on-line live classes, Ready for a new strategy for Dyslexia. Just click the link below.

For all available resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #mindseye #lettersmoving #Dyslexia #breathing #grounding

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Visual Thinking 101_16 How not to teach word recognition

p49_dinasaurWord recognition is essential for fluent reading.  But with an emphasis on phonics ONLY, word recognition is left either left to chance or not being taught in school, as few educationalists have ever discovered how a child develops word recognition. Empowering Learning knows exactly how this transition takes place, by developing your Word \Form Area. One of the first words you can be expected to read or write is your name and the easy way to do that is through word recognition. See my video about scaffolding easy literacy.

There are at least 7 ways that are poor strategies for developing word recognition, that can be improved, by the work done by Empowering Learning with the aid of neuroscience:

  1. Being stressed –  when you are stressed it is very difficult to do anything and that includes reading and writing. Grounding, breathing and being relaxed will improve this.
  2. 3 positions for reading – try reading looking down at the desk, then with the book slightly tipped up then with the book right up in front of your eyes.  Which is the best position for you? Flat on the table is normally more difficult and if you have any visual stress with the letters moving around on the page, don’t look down it puts you into negative emotions or nasty self-talk.
  3. Expecting that decoding words through phonics will lead to word recognition. This works for some but others drop into mild or severe learning difficulties. It is a poor strategy as neuroscience tells us that word recognition and decoding words work in different parts of the brain and it relies on luck to make this migration. Read on and see how this can be improved.
  4. Techniques where you look at the word, cover it and then attempt to write it.  When students are looking down at a desk they are not in the best position for getting their brain to access their word form area that is part of their internal mental imagery.  When students look up they will have better access to mental imagery, vital for word recognition.  For example, think of a dog; looking up will give you the best picture, looking down will get you into your emotions (maybe frightened) and self-talk (thinking he will bite me). The series that works best is lookup, see an image, capture a word image and write it down (without looking down at the paper).
  5. Focusing on high-frequency words does not encourage word recognition, most don’t have mental images.  Start with object words until the student is confident of visualising words.
  6. Modelling in plasticine is a useful technique, especially for the very young, but is slow and repetitive for older children and it does not encourage the student to look up and see their own mental images
  7. Nonsense words focus on phonics and we certainly don’t want students creating mental images of nonsense words.

Join our The Secrets of Dyslexia and ADHD,  and find out how to do word recognition easily and effectively in minutes, whether or not you are Dyslexic.  This work is all based on how people who do word recognition successfully do it, it is just a skill to learn.

#dyslexia #wordrecognition #nonsensewords #highfrequencywords #lookcoverwrite #decoding #empoweringlearning

If you would like to improve creativity and abilities to visualise do come and join one of my free group coaching sessions to explore mental images.

For all available resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #creativity #mindseye #highfrequencywords #Dyslexia #ADHD #nonsencewords #wordrecognition

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Visual Thinking 101_15 To Appreciate all Kinds of Minds

Like many others, by mission is to appreciate different kinds of minds and ensure they are not screened out by one-size-fits-all. Thomas G West writes in In the Mind’s Eye, “for a certain group of people the handicap itself may be fundamentally and essentially associated with the gift….too often the gift is not recognised and is regarded only as a problem.”

Visual thinking is undoubtedly a skill that fires creativity, imagination and many more strengths

Can you inspire others with your pictures by describing your mental images? Let’s think of a sunrise; firstly a dark sky littered with stars and the distant tweeting of birds waking up. They a little touch of sunlight from behind a cloud, then the shapes of the trees, then the noises of the world waking up. I invite you to continue with your own story.

Here is an extract from All Kinds of Minds:

There are all kinds of jobs to be done in the world.
So, it’s a good thing that we have all kinds of minds to do them.
Luckily every kind of mind has some kinds of mind work that it can do to make the world a much better place.
But first we all need to understand our own minds.
Wouldn’t it be great if we could all feel great about our own minds?
Wouldn’t it be fun if we could all enjoy each others’ kinds of minds
Then we might live in a world where all kinds of minds would be happy and proud to be living all kinds of lives.

Dr. Mel Lavene, All Kinds of minds, Page 27.

If you would like to improve creativity and abilities to visualise do come and join one of my free group coaching sessions to explore mental images.

For all available resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #creativity #minds #thomasgwest #drmellavene #mindseye

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Visual Thinking 101_14 How to recognise visual thinking

How can we recognise visual thinking? It is a lot easier than you think! Just watch a person’s eyes. When they are looking up they are accessing their visual pictures, sideways is auditory and looking down is emotions and internal dialogue.

Let’s add a bit more detail. If their eyes are still they are seeing still images, if they are rapidly moving, their images will be moving too or maybe they are watching a video. Visual recall, for things you have seen before, is often up to the left and visual construct for imagination is often up to the right. But sometimes they are just the other way around, that isn’t a problem.

Most people don’t even realise they are looking up and seeing images, it all happens too fast and it has become an unconscious habit over the years. Looking up to see images of words is just the same skill. In fact, when we teach children this skill we get them to superimpose words on familiar objects to get them started.

Looking down to see images is much more difficult and often gets you into negative emotions or self-talk, e.g. I can’t do this, its impossible.

One of the children I worked with was trying to remember the cartoon written on his folder. He was just gazing out into space. I asked him what he could see and he said nothing. I suggested he might bring nothing nearer and he rocked back in his chair as it landed on the window frame. He could immediately tell me all the details of the cartoon. So when people lose their pictures they can often get them back. These pictures are so vital for creativity.

Don’t forget that even strong visual thinkers may not be thinking visually all the time. If someone is telling you they are sad or unhappy they will probably be looking down. Suggest they look up to where the wall meets the ceiling and continue with the story. After about 30 secs they may say “what happened then? Its not as bad up there as it was before!” An invaluable tip. Every doctor or nurse should know this!

If you would like to improve creativity and abilities to visualise do come and join one of my free group coaching sessions to explore mental images.

For all available resources, look up www.visualkids.co.uk. When building on skills and encouraging creativity you will find their strengths increase and learning difficulties reduce.

Click above to book your place now at one of the free coaching sessions.

My name is Olive Hickmott, I am a health and learning coach, specialising in working with neurodivergent students. I would be pleased to support you in any way I can.
You are welcome to contact me olive@empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here you will find my learning platform for some of my training programmes and free live webinars  www.visualkids.co.uk
You will find other useful information and Practitioner Training at http://www.empoweringlearning.co.uk
Here is my YouTube channel for more free resources: https://www.youtube.com/c/OliveHickmott
My latest books are:
The Elephants in the Classroom: using every student’s natural power of Mental Imagery to enhance learning: Neurodiversity through the lens of mental Imagery.
Bridges to Success – How to transform Learning Difficulties

#olivehickmott #visualthinking #empoweringlearning #neurodivergent #mentalimagery #creativity #eyes #video

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